Taking in the Good with HEAL

Taking in the Good with HEAL

 

EvHardwiring Happinesser notice how quickly pleasure fades from our thoughts while grievances or resentments linger?  Recent findings in neurobiology reveal that our brains are more hardwired for negative thinking than positive.  Think of it as a survival strategy thousands of years old.  Back in the Paleolithic era, the potential to be eaten was significant, thus, our brain, particularly the brainstem, has a habit of attending to threats—quickly!  Yet feelings of contentment and connection, with centers in the mid-brain and pre-frontal cortex, are easily overwhelmed by these physical survival patterns.  Psychologist Rick Hanson has written about this extensively in his most recent book Hardwiring Happiness, and his solution, using Positive Neuroplasticity, is the HEAL practice.  Let’s take a look.  [Read More]

The Healing Narrative – Choosing a Story that Heals

Faced with the grief that inevitably accompanies loss – whether due to illness, injury, death or departure of a loved one or any other trauma, what is the story we choose to tell, and how and why do we tell it? Do we tell a story of resistance, victimhood, blame and guilt that relentlessly revisits the trauma – what we might call an illness, injury or victim narrative? Or do we tell a story of acceptance, awareness, connection, gratitude and presence – what we’ll call here a healing narrative?

reggie pic1The choices we make and the stories we tell emerge from how we see our lives, and have a powerful impact on what we’ll be able to see and do next. We learn our earliest storytelling predispositions from the narratives our parents, guardians and teachers tell when we’re very young. Having just fallen from the tree and broken our 8-year-old arm, are we confronted with an inquisitorial scolding about carelessness, danger and fear, or are we enveloped in a loving embrace that connects with our pain, creates awareness around the risks of exploring while still accepting the inherent value therein, and expresses gratitude that we are, in fact, all right – albeit with a broken arm. These earliest narratives set a thematic undertone that we may not be aware of for years, if ever.  [Read More]